Tag: search results

Home >> Posts tagged "search results" (Page 2)

Your Webmaster Should Take A Look At This

Yesterday (16 July 2012) Google's Webmaster Central Blog published a post explaining "semantics" (more about that in a moment) of web pages, urging sites to use semantic markup (specific types of HTML), and several "Do's and Don'ts". Could this be a signal of an upcoming algorithm change? A Bit of Background This will be the geeky part, but a bit of background will help understand what may turn out to be significant about the Google Webmaster Central post mentioned above. If you prefer, just skip to the last section for the punch line. The code used to create web pages, generally speaking, is HTML. The actual "tags" used to designate elements (headers, paragraphs, blocks, etc.) is called "markup." There are standards for properly creating pages with HTML, and those standards change and are updated as new browser features and other online capabilities become available. Google (and other browser and search firms) are usually represented in the updating and standards for HTML. The latest version of the HTML standards was HTML5, which was not officially released. One group has gone forward with it, while another has renamed HTML5 as HTML and continues it as a work in progress. We'll refer to both interchangeably as HTML5, for purposes of this post. HTML5, not fully supported by all browsers at this time, replaces some generic markup with "semantic" markup. For example, before HTML5 you might have a section of your HTML markup called a "div" - a generic block that could be used for any purpose. One div might be your navigation links, and another might be a feed from your blog. These could be differentiated by an "id" so a div with an id of "nav" might be your navigation links, and a div with an id of "feed" might be your…

How to Provide the Information Guests Want

Our first post in this series provided an overview of how guests find and book a lodging property, based on research from WIHP, a hotel marketing agency. The four step process assumes the future guest has selected a destination area and then proceeds through the steps of (1) discovery of a particular property, (2) seeking information about the property to see if it is a good prospect (the zero moment of truth), (3) the guest on your website (the first moment of truth), and (4) the guest at your property (the second moment of truth). Our second post discussed the process by which a guest "discovers" (or learns of) your property as a possible place to stay. Our topic today, then, is the "Zero Moment of Truth," or the time when the guest has decided on a location to visit, has learned of your property as a possible place to stay, but has not yet seen your website, and wants to find out more about your property. [pullquote]Around 80% of searches for more information are on a search engine. Ignore that at your peril.[/pullquote] The findings from WIHP indicate that nearly three-quarters (72.9%) of all prospective guests will look for your property on a search engine. Another 9.6% will look on a mapping website. Since most (but certainly not all) mapping sites are affiliated with search engines, this amounts to around 80% of all searches for more information going through a search engine. That is a statistic to be ignored at your peril. Another 7.3% seek information from a review site (such as TripAdvisor, Yelp, etc.). After that the numbers fall off radically for travel guides (3%) and social media sites (0.8%). Just a side note - if you're counting on your social media sites (Facebook, Google Plus, etc.) to…

Analytics simplified – GA Evolution

From conversations with innkeepers at some recent conferences, we know that innkeepers understand that web analytics are important, and they are searching for ways to use and understand them, but are not finding that to be an easy task. We were looking at tools that provided some additional capabilities for Google Analytics, and came across GA Evolution, and think it may help some innkeepers get useful results, without overwhelming amounts of raw data. GA Evolution is not intended to provide all the information in Google Analytics. For example, it provides no information on where your visitors came from, time on site, etc. However, it does a really nice job of slicing and dicing the information about visits, page views, bounce rate, etc., while remaining easy to use. Getting Started [caption id="attachment_274" align="alignright" width="300" caption="GA Evolution Metrics"][/caption] In order to get started with Evolution, you'll need to have a Google Analytics account, and it must already be collecting data on your website (that is, it must have been installed for a month or more, or Evolution won't have much to do). If you haven't yet set up Google Analytics, you'll find an overview of the steps needed to set up Google Analytics in our article providing an overview of analytics. Once it is active, you can set up Evolution, and then all you need is a month or more of statistics-gathering by Google. If you have a GA account, log in to the account and authorize Evolution to access your GA data. If you have multiple sites and/or profiles in GA, you can select the one to use, then choose the data to graph and away you go with nice, simple graphs of only the information you want to see! Getting the Data [caption id="attachment_275" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="GA Evolution Data"][/caption] Once…

Google Instant: Love it, hate it? It’s here.

What is Google Instant? Search results while you're typing. Not the little drop-down thingie that anticipates what you'll type, but actual results (complete with local map, for appropriate searches) that change as you type. See the screen shot below for an example. Notice that while the user has typed in "bed and" Google suggest has added "breakfast" and the search results are for the full term "bed and breakfast". If you change the third word to bath, the results change. Is this a good thing or a bad thing? The answer to that question depends on a number of factors. Google's Matt Cutts says you should give it a chance, as it will speed up your research, getting you results really quickly. He also addresses concerns that this will destroy, or at least change Search Engine Optimization (SEO). No doubt it will change SEO, as search, like the internet itself, is not static. Things change, and businesses adapt. SEO adapts regularly to new algorithms, new players (Bing), etc. This is just another new factor. It will change things. How it will change them remains to be seen. For a fun example of using Google Instant, and a really effective ad, see Google's video, below. Thoughts? Comments?

How will you rank in local social results?

As if you haven't heard enough about getting started with Facebook, Twitter and other social media, and you need to claim your Google Place Page (formerly Local Business Center listing), here we go again, with more changes to the way we market our businesses. Those who are on Twitter will have noticed that the web pages for posting have recently shown a link asking if you want to add your location to your posts. If you thought about it at all, it probably looked like Twitter was defending itself against Foursquare's location-based messages. That appears to be the case, certainly, but an article from the journal Search Engine Land shows more is going on than meets the eye, and speculates about upcoming uses for the information. Behind the scenes If you are using the web interface, when a tweet includes location information, you can move your mouse pointer over the location, to see a pop-up bubble with information about that location. Twitter announced on June 14 that this feature would be rolled out in 65 countries over the next week. The image below is a link to the Search Engine Land post's image, as our account doesn't yet show the location information. [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="549" caption="Twitter place information"][/caption] Clicking the "Tweets about this place" link displays a search results page, showing tweets about this location. What this means for lodging properties This is all very cute, you may say, but who has time, and what difference does it make? The answer to the second part of the question is also the answer to the first - if it is important, you'll have to make time. If you're familiar with Google Place Pages (and you should be!) you know that your local business can claim its page and provide information…

×